OSHA 30 Hour Construction Safety and Health

OSHA 30 Hour Construction Safety and Health

The OSHA Outreach Training Program for the Construction Industry provides training for workers and employers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces in the construction industry. The program also provides information regarding workers’ rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint. This course is more appropriate for supervisors or workers with some safety responsibility. Through this training, OSHA helps to ensure that workers are more knowledgeable about workplace hazards and their rights and contribute to our nation’s productivity.

Description

When you’re responsible for keeping a construction site safe and secure, you need every tool you can get. Our OSHA 30 Hour Construction teaches you precisely what you need to know to build a culture of safety and reduce job-site accidents. In Osha 30 Training you’ll receive a comprehensive overview of the policies, procedures, and best practices in OSHA’s 29 CFR 1926 standards for construction. The Osha 30 training course also covers vital information about all the significant hazards found on a construction site.
OSHA 30-Hour training for construction and general industry prepares supervisors and workers to avoid workplace safety and health risks. Topics covered in OSHA 30-Hour training include general worksite safety, avoiding common hazards, understanding workers’ rights, employer responsibilities and more.

Duration: 30 hours

Language: English, Spanish

 

Learning Objectives

  • Given OSHA historical events and current information, the student will be able to explain the importance of OSHA in providing a safe and healthful workplace to workers covered by OSHA
  • Locate OSHA Standards references applicable to specific hazardous conditions and practices (Introduction to OSHA Standards)
  • Recognize the aspects of 1926 Subpart C (General Safety and Health Provisions)
  • Implement preventative measures for accidents in their workplace (Subpart D – Occupational health and Environmental Controls)
  • Describe types of personal protective equipment (PPE), and the requirements for use in OSHA standards (Subpart E – Personal Protective Equipment)
  • Understand the requirements for fire protection in the workplace (Subpart F – Fire Protection and Prevention)
  • Identify types of rigging equipment used to protect employees (Subpart H – Rigging; Subpart N – Cranes and Rigging)
  • Identify the critical health and safety hazards of welding and cutting in the construction industry (Subpart J – Welding and Cutting)
  • Implement measures for protecting workers and equipment from dangerous falls (Subpart M – Fall Protection)
  • Recognize the hazards associated with working in or around excavation sites (Subpart P – Excavations)
  • Understand the safety requirements necessary to protect workers around concrete and masonry jobs (Subpart Q – Concrete and Masonry)
  • Identify the precautions and hazards to protect workers using explosives or blasting agents (Subpart T – Demolition)
  • Protect workers who perform jobs on or around stairways or ladders at worksites (Subpart X – Stairways and Ladders)
  • List and describe the hazards and prevalence of confined spaces
  • Identify common electrical hazards and related OSHA standards (Subpart K – Electrical Standards)
  • Understand the importance of scaffolding for workers in elevated workplaces (Subpart L – Scaffolding)

Course Outline

  • Orientation
  • Introduction to OSHA and the OSH Act
  • Recordkeeping
  • Basic Safety Orientation
  • General Safety and Health Provisions
  • Health Hazards: Hazard Communication
  • Health Hazards: Hazardous Materials
  • Process Safety Management: (PSM)
  • Personal Protective Equipment
  • Fire Protection
  • Materials Handling and Storage
  • Hand and Power Tools
  • Welding and Cutting
  • Focus Four Electrical Safety
  • Focus Four Struck-By and Caught in Between Hazards
  • Focus Four Fall Protection
  • Cranes and Rigging
  • Motor Vehicles
  • Excavations
  • Concrete and Masonry Construction
  • Stairways and Ladders
  • Confined Spaces
  • Lead Safety in the Workplace
  • Use of Explosives in the Workplace
  • Scaffolds

OSHA Certification

What Does OSHA Certification Mean?

OSHA certification is an official certificate of competency issued in accordance with the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and represents the achievement of outcomes stipulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. OSHA training consists of around 30 hours and must be specific to the industry in which you work.

More than 90 million American spend their days on the job. As a nation, they are our most valuable resource. And surprisingly until 1970, no uniform and comprehensive requirements existed for workplace safety and their protection against health hazards.

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